Research into Interaction Design Practice

Who We Are

This is an NSF funded research project conducted at the Human-Computer Interaction Design program at the School of Informatics and Computing, Indiana University, Bloomington.

PIs: Erik Stolterman, PhD. and Martin Siegel, PhD

Contributing members: Jordan Beck, Nathan Bilancio, Colin Gray, Gary Dickson, Minqi Luo, David Roedl, Omar Sosa Tzec, and Mengyao Zhao


Erik Stolterman

Erik Stolterman
Erik Stolterman


Erik Stolterman
is Professor and Chair of Informatics at the School of Informatics and Computing, Indiana University, Bloomington. Stolterman’s main work is within interaction design, philosophy and theory of design, information technology and society, information systems design, and philosophy of technology. Stolterman has published a large number of articles and five books, including “Thoughtful Interaction Design” (2004, MIT Press) and “The Design Way” (awarded “Outstanding book of the year 2003” by the American Association for Educational Communications and Technology). Stolterman’s research can be characterized as being grounded in careful analytical studies of the everyday practice of users and professionals dealing with interactive artifacts with a strong emphasis of building theory. Stolterman combines this approach with a strong critical and theoretical analysis of current practice.


Martin A. Siegel

Marty Siegel
Marty Siegel


Marty Siegel
 is a Professor of Informatics, Education, and Cognitive Science. From 1991-1999 he was the director of research and development at the Center for Excellence in Education. In this context he founded Indiana University’s first start-up company, WisdomTools (founded in 1999). The WisdomTools Scenarios product is designed to develop deep, insightful learning, a kind of practical intelligence or tacit knowledge.

Marty is among a group of pioneers in computer-based learning, beginning with his work in the 1970’s and 1980’s on the PLATO system. At the University of Illinois, Marty was a professor in the Departments of Information Science and Educational Psychology. Additionally, he was the assistant director of the Computer-based Education Research Laboratory (CERL) and head of CERL’s Curriculum and Applications Group. Between 1990 and 1991, he served as director of professional services at Authorware (now Macromedia, Inc.). In 1988, he was Microsoft’s first faculty fellow.

At the School of Informatics, Marty’s research focuses on the design of Digital Learning Environments, including the development of deep conversation spaces as well as and time- and space-based visualization tools. His current focus is on design pedagogy, the education of next generation interaction designers.


Jordan Beck

Jordan Beck
Jordan Beck


Jordan Beck
is a Masters student in HCI/d at Indiana University’s School of Informatics and Computing; he will become a doctoral student as of the fall 2013 semester. He comes to IU with an A.M. from the University of Chicago and three years of professional experience as an educator and instructional designer. His research interests revolve around design pedagogy, in particular: the role of design-independent concepts in a design curriculum and the development of the notion of self as designer.


Gary Dickson

Gary Dickson
Gary Dickson


Gary Dickson
is a doctoral student studying Human-Computer Interaction Design in the School of Informatics at Indiana University. He earned a MGD from North Carolina State University and a BFA in graphic design from California College of the Arts.

He has taught graphic design at Cornish College of the Arts in Seattle as well as at North Carolina State University and recently at Indiana University as a Visiting Assistant Professor in the School of Fine Arts.

As a visual designer Gary brings with him nearly 15 years of experience in practice. He has been involved with nearly every aspect of the visual design process and industry. Much of this experience has been gained through operating his own design studio.

His research interests include design pedagogy, systems theory and design methodology.


Colin Gray

Colin Gray
Colin Gray


Colin Gray
is a Ph.D. Candidate in Instructional Systems Technology in the School of Education at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. He has previously completed a M.Ed. in Educational Technology from University of South Carolina and a M.A. in Graphic Design from Savannah College of Art & Design, and has worked as a design practitioner for over ten years. His research interests include investigating the student experience of design pedagogy,  barriers to the development of design thinking, and methods to reveal tacit design judgment and thinking. Colin has over 10 years of experience as a graphic designer, instructional designer, and interaction designer.


David Roedl

David Roedl
David Roedl


David Roedl
is a doctoral student studying Human-Computer Interaction in the School of Informatics and Computing. He earned a B.S and a M.S from Indiana University and has worked as a user experience designer for over 8 years. His research interests include design theory and practice, and the relationships between design and environmental sustainability.


Omar Sosa-Tzec

Omar Sosa Tzec
Omar Sosa Tzec


Omar Sosa-Tzec
participates in this project as Research Assistant where he conducts research and as a project manager. He is a doctoral student in Informatics–focused in Human-Computer Interaction–at the School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. He has previously completed a M.Sc. in Information Design from Universidad of the Americas Puebla, a M.Sc. in Computing and Industrial Mathematics from the Center of Research in Mathematics, and a B.Sc. in Computer Science from University of Yucatan, all of them in Mexico.

Omar has been involved in the practice of design for over 10 years. He specializes in Visual Information Design applied in User Interfaces and Communication, and also in Information Architecture. He also counts with experience on teaching Interaction Design and Information Design, both at undergraduate and graduate levels. His research interests include visual communication and thinking within interaction design processes, visual aesthetics in user interfaces, and design pedagogy based on significant experiences and creativity development.